by Beau Chatham April 5, 2011
I’ve received some recent inquiries from clients, specifically around the images of service members I use on Facebook, and how my coaching process applies to those that have not served in the military. Some ask, “why warrior?”  Others inquire, “Are you going to teach me to fight?” Or “how can I accomplish more in my life if I am at war with someone?” These are all great questions, but for those that know me and know my background it’s easily understood.  For those of you that are beginning this journey with me, allow me focus this blog post to answer the questions around the use of the term warrior.
by Beau Chatham March 5, 2011
If you've been reading my last few posts, you know that we've been revealing some medical studies that demonstrate the prevalence of PTSD (a.k.a. adrenaline poisoning) in returning service men and women.  On a particular note, we have learned that the bulk of the symptoms in our combat-exposed warriors have a tendency to manifest 3-6 months after they return from the "combat box."
by Beau Chatham March 2, 2011
In my last blog post, we looked at the delay of our warriors reporting symptoms consistent with "adrenaline poisoning."  In many of the study subjects, there existed a 3-6 month delay in leaving the combat box, before symptoms for combat stress fully manifested and began to affect the warrior's behavior.
by Beau Chatham January 23, 2011
In the military, there is a technique for estimating distance.  It's known as counting "flash-to-bang" time.  It works like this: An explosion takes place and immediately you see the "flash" of the explosion. Start your timer... Sometime later (depending on your distance from the explosion) you hear the "bang." Stop your timer!
by Beau Chatham December 14, 2010
 
by Beau Chatham December 10, 2010
In a recent blog post, I shared with you the weakness or Achilles Heel of our deployed warriors and the lack of protection that our fighting forces have when it comes to protecting themselves from the damaging effects of improvised explosive devices or IEDs.
by hali November 25, 2010
I sat behind the bullet proof glass at my newly cushy job with the Alberta Government in a Calgary court house as a judge's assistant, I found myself thinking..is this it?  Is this my life?  Everyday, from 9am-4:30pm, I will be here…"there has to be more" I thought…"there is more"…Then I would go home, which consisted of half hour train ride then a 45 minute drive in rush hour traffic (ewe), and find comfort and peace on my yoga mat.  It wasn't that I could (or can) contort my body into a pretzel, it WAS that I could connect with my breath, feel my heart beating and my body moving.  I would move away the stresses of the day and become one with my spirit…and think "ahhhh…yessss….THIS is what IT is about, this IS my life..right here, right now".  This "ah-ha" moment was back in 2005, when my interest of becoming a Yoga Teacher sparked and I began my studies in Yoga.  
by Beau Chatham November 18, 2010
I was in a yoga class last week and my mind began to wander... I'm pausing here, because I imagine I am getting a few strange looks from some of my readers.  I can hear your comments from here: "Yoga?"  "Are you kidding me?" I promise there is a point to this story, so keep moving warriors.
by Beau Chatham September 7, 2010
In a previous blog post back in April, I speculated on the National Football League’s (NFL) intentions of setting a higher standard for head injuries and how our warriors might learn from their experiences. As previously stated, in December of 2009, the NFL announced stricter guidelines on when players could return to the field after a head injury. The stricter 2009 statement on return-to-play was developed by the NFL’s medical committee on concussions in conjunction with team doctors, outside medical experts, and the NFL Players Association in order to provide more specificity in making return-to-play decisions. The new guidance supplements the 2007 statement on return-to-play that encouraged team physicians and athletic trainers to continue to take a conservative approach to treating concussions and established that a player should not return to the same game after a concussion if the team medical staff determined that he had lost consciousness.
by Beau Chatham August 20, 2010
A friend of mine invited me over to his house for dinner.  As I drove into his neighborhood, it was apparent by the size and quality of the homes, he was a very successful entrepreneur. His wife met me at the front door, showed me into their home and we proceeded to enjoy some great food.  After dinner, my friend (let’s call him Chuck) invites me outside for an after dinner cigar.   As we are enjoying a fine smoke and Chuck is checking his stocks in the Wall Street Journal he says to me, “Hey, you want to see something really fierce?”  He had my curiosity, so I said, “Sure!”
by Beau Chatham August 5, 2010
Some time between 563 - 483 BC, a young Hindu prince named Siddhartha Gautama uttered the phrase, "you will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger." We now know him by the name Buddha. Although these words are over 2,000 years old, they are apparently true today. In a recent investigation, led by scientists from the University of Valencia, researchers analyzed the changes in the brain's cardiovascular, hormonal, and asymmetric activation response (I will explain this in detail in a moment) when we get angry. What they found was very interesting. They observed increases in heart rate and rising arterial tension, along with increased testosterone production, and a decrease in cortisol (the stress hormone) production. Now these findings have always been know for many years, but the measurements were taken, nonetheless. What I found most interesting about this study were the findings around asymmetric activation response.
by Beau Chatham July 19, 2010
Before I begin this week's blog post, I would like to let all combat veteran readers know that I will be discussing scenes from a film I recently had the honor of screening.  It is about combat in Afghanistan.  It's entitled: Restrepo. It is powerful. It is raw. It is real. Knowing that this narrative could cause some of my brothers and sisters in arms to relive some of their own trauma, I wanted to give you a heads up!   Please think twice before reading. With that said, let's begin:
by Beau Chatham July 14, 2010
 Over the past 8 weeks, I have given you several new ways to look at healing your PTSD.  In taking this approach, I have received some questions from friends asking about the use of war principles to heal an anxiety disorder.  Well, if you had these same questions, I trust you went the extra step to read the posts so you could see that these Principles provide you a framework and philosophy for approaching this demon that hides inside you and many of our war-torn brothers and sisters.  If you did read along, then I want to thank you for your time.  I would even like to thank you for passing this blog along to others that may be wrestling with this disorder or sharing my blog with someone that you suspect may be suffering in silence.  
by Tara Shadowen July 13, 2010
Many of you reading this are Americans, and as such, are not necessarily soccer fans, but before it ended last Sunday, the 2010 FIFA World Cup soccer championship offered a wider-than-usual range of behaviors from athletes, trainers, coaches and national ministers of sport.  I'm thinking in particular of the crisis in interpersonal relations on France's 2010 World Cup soccer team.  It's not typical for a team to more or less self-destruct before viewers' eyes, but France's team came as close as you can to doing that.  Should details interest you, there are plenty of articles archived on Yahoo Sport's FIFA World Cup coverage.   What struck me while watching the analysis on ESPN was an insight from German soccer great Jürgen Klinsman regarding the, shall we say, unconstructive words and actions from athletes on the French team:.
by Dr. Jeffrey T. Litchford July 9, 2010
The "Who" rock and roll group made famous the observation, "No matter where you go, there you are"!  Many of us live a life of frustration, stress and worry because we are not living in the moment We have this deep inner feeling that we could do what we do so much better but don't know why we seem to be blocked or held back..  We are not "where we are"!  I would like to revisit the Tyranny of Time in a series of blogs that will assist you in obtaining what successful business owmers, athletes, world leaders and people of wisdom call "living in the zone" or living in a state of 'Flow'.
by Beau Chatham June 26, 2010
 If you've been following me over the last few weeks, you know that I introduced the idea of incorporating the Principles of War as a means of dealing with PTSD. In doing this, my hope is to help you achieve a deeper level of thought about how you might go about choosing methods for your healing.  By introducing a single Principle of War, in a series of posts over the next several weeks, I am giving you a new set of criteria that you can use to evaluate the possible courses of action that you choose for your healing journey.  
by Beau Chatham June 12, 2010
 If you've been following me over the last few weeks, you know that I introduced the idea of incorporating the Principles of War as a means of dealing with PTSD. In doing this, my hope is to help you achieve a deeper level of thought about how you might go about choosing methods for your healing.  By introducing a single Principle of War, in a series of posts over the next several weeks, I am giving you a new set of criteria that you can use to evaluate the possible courses of action that you choose for your healing journey.   
by Beau Chatham June 4, 2010
 If you've been following me over the last few weeks, you know that I introduced the idea of incorporating the Principles of War as a means of dealing with PTSD. In doing this, my hope is to help you achieve a deeper level of thought about how you might go about choosing methods for your healing.  By introducing a single Principle of War, in a series of posts over the next several weeks, I am giving you a new set of criteria that you can use to evaluate the possible courses of action that you choose for your healing journey.   
by Beau Chatham May 17, 2010
 In my last blog , I introduced the idea of incorporating the Principles of War as a means of dealing with PTSD. In doing this, my hope is to help you achieve a deeper level of thought about how you might go about choosing a method for your healing.  By introducing a single Principle of War, in a series of posts over the next several weeks, I am giving you a new set of criteria that you can use to evaluate the possible courses of action that you choose for your healing journey.   
by Beau Chatham May 16, 2010
I started this blog with the intent of creating dialogue around Warriors and how they might heal themselves.  Having a strong background in military planning, I always took an opportunity to communicate in a manner that my sisters and brothers-in-arms might appreciate.  Well, in this edition of The Warrior Nation: SITREP, I thought I might just take a real big bite out of post-traumatic stress disorder by applying a little "fight fire with fire" methodology.  In other words, I think it is time for us to apply the Principles of War to Healing PTSD. Outside the Box

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